March 1987 - Volume 11 • Number 3 - Modern Drummer Magazine

March 1987 – Volume 11 • Number 3

Graeme Edge, Joe Smyth, Mitch Mitchell, Neil Peart, S.P. Leary, Fred Below, Chris Layton, Fred Grady, David Olsen, Panama Francis, Harry Lewis, Dave Weckl, David Garibaldi
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Articles in March 1987

Up & Coming

Smash Palace’s Harry Lewis

His movements were overemphasized, and his sound cut through like a cannon. Also, although his concentration was intense, he offered direct eye contact with the audience.

by Denise Skea
Mar 26, 2019
Portraits

Panama Francis

In a career that has spanned half a century, Panama Francis has made his mark as both a big band and a rock 'n' roll drummer.

by Chip Deffaa
Mar 26, 2019
Concepts

Drumming And The Practice Pad

Some drummers hate practice pads; others are never without them. Some teachers recommend practice pads; others say that you should practice on the drums.

by Roy Burns
Mar 26, 2019
Education

Creative Triplets For The Advanced Player: Part 2

Syncopated figures could be used within an underlying framework of 8th-note triplets.

by Mark Hurley
Mar 26, 2019
Features

Joe Smyth — The Big Break

Through talent, fate, or whatever, he's now playing drums with one of the most popular country/rock bands performing today, Sawyer Brown.

by William F. Miller
Mar 26, 2019
Features

Blues Drummers: Part 2

Blues legends S.P. Leary and Fred Below, Stevie Ray Vaughn's Chris Layton, Jimmy Johnson's Fred Grady, and Robert Cray's David Olson.

by Robert Santelli
Mar 26, 2019
Features

The Moody Blue's Graem Edge

The Moodies were (and still are) technologically advanced for the times—any times—and because of that, in those early days, their music was sometimes construed as pretentious.

by Robyn Flans
Mar 26, 2019